Historical Fiction, More Thrillers, and Science Fiction/Fantasy

Picking up from yesterday’s post….

For our suspense/crime/thriller readers, here are a few new authors to try:  Joe Ide has written a fascinating murder story, Hi Five, that involves arms dealers and a witness, also a suspect, with multiple personalities.  This one will keep the reader on their toes.  Lucy Foley’s second book, The Hunting Party, is the story of a group of friends who gather on New Years to bring in the new year and one of them turns up dead in the midst of a blizzard.  The Wife Who Knew Too Much  by Michele Campbell is set in the Hamptons and involves murder and characters who will do anything, criminal or not, for love and money.  Pretty Things by Janelle Brown tosses together troubled family relationships, theft and con artistry, and fabulous settings all into a page-turning book.  Alex North returns with The Shadows, another creepy, scary story that involves the blending of dreams and reality.  This one will keep you up at night, so get your night lights ready!

Historical fiction, especially novels set during and around World War II, are hot now, and we’ve got several for you to enjoy.  The Vanishing Sky by Annette L. Binder studies a family who is torn apart by opposing viewpoints of events in Germany as World War II comes to a close.  Universe of Two by Stephen Kiernan is a fictionalized story of a real-life mathematician who worked on the Manhattan Project.  The Queen’s Secret by Karen Harper is the story of Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and her will of steel that helped her husband settle into his unexpected role of king and guided England through some of its darkest times.  Exile Music by Jennifer Steil is the story of a Jewish family who flees Vienna for Bolivia when the German forces invade Austria.  Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini is a novel about a group of American Women in Berlin who wage a secret war against Hitler.  To Wake the Giant by Jeff Shaara is a novel of Pearl Harbor, a departure for Shaara, who has spent most of his career writing about the Civil War.

Historical fiction titles that are not set during World War II include Simon the Fiddler by Paulette Jiles, The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner, and  The Paris Hours by Alex George.  Simon the Fiddler is set in post-Civil War Texas, The Paris Hours is set during the brilliant and lush Belle Epoque, and The Jane Austen Society is set in a small village in England in the years just after World War II.  It is a must-read for those who enjoyed The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel SocietyThe Woman Before Wallis: A Novel of Windsors, Vanderbilts, and Royal Scandal by Bryn Turnbull is as delicious as its title.  Miss Austen by Gill Hornby is about Jane Austen’s sister, Cassandra, and her life after the death of her sister.

I’ll finish up this post by letting you all know about some science fiction/fantasy titles that we’ve just received.  The Chosen Ones by Veronica Roth is an adult title written by the author of the Divergent series, and it is apocalyptic, sweeping, and brilliant.  The Last Emperox  by John Scalzi is the last of a trilogy and is very timely: it is about an epidemic of a viral disease.  The Blue Ticket by Sophie Mackintosh and Master Class by Christina Dalcher would be interesting to read together.  They’re both stories about a not-too-distant future when women and girls are forced into roles and lives against their will by governmental powers.

I’ll write one more post this week tomorrow and let you all know about some very timely and contemporary fiction, some literary fiction, and a lot of novels about families and relationships.  We have so many new books in – please come browse our new book shelves.  Our browsing hours are 11am to 2pm Tuesday through Saturday.  You can also read more about these and other great titles in our catalog:  https://uppl.ent.sirsi.net/client/en_US/external.  From the catalog, requests can be placed for books for curbside pick up.

New Non Fiction and Thrillers

Hello! The blog is back, and so are new books! We have so many new ones, that I’m going to break this post up over the next three days, discussing new books by subject/genre and give very little commentary on each title.
In nonfiction, we have some new titles that cover natural phenomena, current events, and some memoirs with a little history in between. Growing Old: Notes on Aging with Something Like Grace by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas is an affirming book about the beauty and joys that come with age. We finally have a copy of Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man by Mary L. Trump, the President’s niece. Mary Trump is a clinical psychologist and gives insight on Trump family history. The Answer Is…Reflections on My Life by Alex Trebek will be a favorite among those who have faithfully watched Jeopardy each night. Rivers of Power: How a Natural Force Raised Kingdoms, Destroyed Civilizations, and Shaped Our World by Laurence C. Smith is a fascinating read about how rivers have shaped geography, economy, and culture throughout history. Thirteen Days in Ferguson is a timely book written by a Ferguson police officer, Ron Johnson, that gives the reader a very close view of what happened during those turbulent days. Five Days: The Reckoning of an American City by Wes Moore is another timely book that offers an in-depth view of the circumstances surrounding the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore and the events that followed. Hell and Other Destinations is former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s memoir of her time as the first female in that position.
For World War II enthusiasts, we have two new titles in: A Game of Birds and Wolves: The Ingenious Young Women Whose Secret Board Game Helped Win World War II by Simon Parkin and The Volunteer: One Man, an Underground Army, and the Secret Mission to Destory Auschwitz by Jack Fairweather. Both books tell the story of two very interesting sides of World War II that you may not have known about before. Written by Forbes senior editor Zack O’Malley Greenburg, A-List Angels How a Band of Actors, Artists, and Athletes Hacked Silicon Valley, talks about just that – how a few actors and entertainers used their social reach and money to fund and launch companies/concepts like Uber, Airbnb, and Spotify. Rounding out some of our new nonfiction titles are two very poignant books: My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me by Jason B. Rosen and My Life in Seven Dogs by Jennifer Finney Boyland. So as not to spoil either of them for you, all I will say is that they are both lovely tales of unexpected events that deeply touched the authors’ lives.
We have some new thriller and crime titles in by some of your favorite authors: Eagle Station by Dale Brown, Never Ask Me by Jeff Abbott, Home Before Dark by Riley Sager, Final Judgement by Marcia Clark, Credible Threat by J. A. Jance, The Persuasion by Iris Johansen, The Night Swim by Megan Golden, Night.Sleep.Death.The Stars by Joyce Carol Oates, and The Girl from Widow Hills by Megan Miranda.
I’ll continue tomorrow with a discussion of some thrillers and suspense books by new authors, some new science fiction/fantasy titles, and a lot of historical fiction. Happy Reading!

We’re Back!

Hello everyone!  It’s been a while, but this blog is back, with new posts forthcoming each week.  We are so glad to be open for you to come in and choose your books.  If you’re busy and can’t get in to the library (which I hope you’ll always make time for the library!), then let us hand-pick some great reads for you.  You can complete the form here: https://upform.wufoo.com/forms/handpicked-reads/  and we’ll email a list to you and put the books on hold.

If you are interested in American history, and especially the settlement of the western part of our country, then we have two new books for you: Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Fremont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War by Steve Inskeep; and The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West by David MCCullough.  Imperfect Union tells the story of John C. Fremont, one of the United States’ greatest explorers and how he mapped the United States in the 1850s not only geographically but also politically.  It also tells the story of his wife, Jessie, who was a woman well before her time and her influence on her husband’s work.  This book will spark memories of things you learned about in your American history classes back in college:  The Missouri Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the California Gold Rush, the concept of Manifest Destiny, and the Mexican-American War.  Inskeep has written this book in an engaging narrative style, which makes it highly readable and enjoyable.  The Pioneers begins during the French and Indian War and continues through the 1860s.  Readers will enjoy the stories about the leaders and settlers who were involved in moving people west of the Mississippi river in the early 19th century and the extraordinary events that led them to look west.  McCullough is one of our greatest writers about American History, and this book does not disappoint.

We have a few new thrillers in, and they will keep you in your toes!  The Truants, a debut novel by Kate Weinberg, is a beautifully written story of four students from very diverse backgrounds who befriend each other when they are new at university.  The dynamic between them turns dark, and a tragedy ensues that breaks up their friendships.  The story also involves love affairs, secrets, and finding your path in life.

The Return by Rachel Harrison involves a missing girl, her best friend who believes she will come back one day, and the return of the missing girl.  Did the missing girl return, or is it someone else?  This debut novel will keep you turning the pages to find out.

The Last Passenger, the latest in the Charles Lenox Mystery series by Charles Finch, is set in London’s Paddington station in 1855.  Young detective Charles Lenox must find the identity of the body of a young gentlemen found slumped in a train car.  The search for his identity shapes Lenox’s character and his career.

Last Girl Standing, by Lisa Jackson and Nancy Bush, will bring back memories of high-school cliques, but it also has the very grown-up concept of how sometimes mistakes and horrible things that happened long ago follow you into adulthood.  The story involves accidental deaths that aren’t accidents that will continue until the last girl is left standing.

The Prized Girl by Amy K. Green involves the murder of a pageant queen, a quaint, idyllic New England town, and her sister’s search for answers about the murder.  The story is told in dual narratives (each of the sisters’) and has dark humor infused throughout, mostly in the voice of the sarcastic sister who is the black sheep of the family.  The humor in the book adds a light touch to an otherwise sad story of complicated family relationships and missed connections.

The Wife and the Widow by Christian White is set on a desolate, eerie island town in the dead of winter.  Very unsettling and frightening, the story surrounds a murder told from two points of view – the widow of the man who was murdered, and the wife of the man who is suspected of killing him.   This book kept me up for most of a weekend night, and it brings to mind the question of how well do we know the people we love and who we are closest to?  This book is a page-turner.