We’re Back!

Hello everyone!  It’s been a while, but this blog is back, with new posts forthcoming each week.  We are so glad to be open for you to come in and choose your books.  If you’re busy and can’t get in to the library (which I hope you’ll always make time for the library!), then let us hand-pick some great reads for you.  You can complete the form here: https://upform.wufoo.com/forms/handpicked-reads/  and we’ll email a list to you and put the books on hold.

If you are interested in American history, and especially the settlement of the western part of our country, then we have two new books for you: Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Fremont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War by Steve Inskeep; and The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West by David MCCullough.  Imperfect Union tells the story of John C. Fremont, one of the United States’ greatest explorers and how he mapped the United States in the 1850s not only geographically but also politically.  It also tells the story of his wife, Jessie, who was a woman well before her time and her influence on her husband’s work.  This book will spark memories of things you learned about in your American history classes back in college:  The Missouri Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the California Gold Rush, the concept of Manifest Destiny, and the Mexican-American War.  Inskeep has written this book in an engaging narrative style, which makes it highly readable and enjoyable.  The Pioneers begins during the French and Indian War and continues through the 1860s.  Readers will enjoy the stories about the leaders and settlers who were involved in moving people west of the Mississippi river in the early 19th century and the extraordinary events that led them to look west.  McCullough is one of our greatest writers about American History, and this book does not disappoint.

We have a few new thrillers in, and they will keep you in your toes!  The Truants, a debut novel by Kate Weinberg, is a beautifully written story of four students from very diverse backgrounds who befriend each other when they are new at university.  The dynamic between them turns dark, and a tragedy ensues that breaks up their friendships.  The story also involves love affairs, secrets, and finding your path in life.

The Return by Rachel Harrison involves a missing girl, her best friend who believes she will come back one day, and the return of the missing girl.  Did the missing girl return, or is it someone else?  This debut novel will keep you turning the pages to find out.

The Last Passenger, the latest in the Charles Lenox Mystery series by Charles Finch, is set in London’s Paddington station in 1855.  Young detective Charles Lenox must find the identity of the body of a young gentlemen found slumped in a train car.  The search for his identity shapes Lenox’s character and his career.

Last Girl Standing, by Lisa Jackson and Nancy Bush, will bring back memories of high-school cliques, but it also has the very grown-up concept of how sometimes mistakes and horrible things that happened long ago follow you into adulthood.  The story involves accidental deaths that aren’t accidents that will continue until the last girl is left standing.

The Prized Girl by Amy K. Green involves the murder of a pageant queen, a quaint, idyllic New England town, and her sister’s search for answers about the murder.  The story is told in dual narratives (each of the sisters’) and has dark humor infused throughout, mostly in the voice of the sarcastic sister who is the black sheep of the family.  The humor in the book adds a light touch to an otherwise sad story of complicated family relationships and missed connections.

The Wife and the Widow by Christian White is set on a desolate, eerie island town in the dead of winter.  Very unsettling and frightening, the story surrounds a murder told from two points of view – the widow of the man who was murdered, and the wife of the man who is suspected of killing him.   This book kept me up for most of a weekend night, and it brings to mind the question of how well do we know the people we love and who we are closest to?  This book is a page-turner.

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